Inland Empire Capaciteria

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Basic Needs

Dec 04 2017

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture supports Community Food Projects through a competitive grants program (CFPCGP). The primary goals of the CFPCGP are to:

•Meet the food needs of low-income individuals through food distribution, community outreach to assist in participation in Federally assisted nutrition programs, or improving access to food as part of a comprehensive service;

•Increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for the food needs of the communities;

•Promote comprehensive responses to local food access, farm, and nutrition issues; and

•Meet specific state, local or neighborhood food and agricultural needs relating to:

oEquipment necessary for the efficient operation of a project;

oPlanning for long-term solutions; or

oThe creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers.

Community Food Projects (CFP) are intended to bring together stakeholders from the distinct parts of the food system and to foster understanding of national food security trends and how they might improve local food systems. The purpose of the CFP is to support the development of projects with a one-time infusion of federal dollars to make such projects self-sustaining. CFPs should be designed to create community-based food projects with objectives, activities, and outcomes that are in alignment with CFPCGP primary goals. The purpose of a Planning Project (PP) is to complete a plan toward the improvement of community food security in keeping with the primary goals of the

CFPCGP. PPs are to focus on a defined community and describe in detail the activities and outcomes of the planning project. Preference will be given to CFPs and PPs designed to:

•Develop linkages between two or more sectors of the food system;

•Support the development of entrepreneurial projects;

•Develop innovative connections between the for-profit and nonprofit food sectors;

•Encourage long-term planning activities, and multi-system, interagency approaches with collaborations from multiple stakeholders that build the long-term capacity of communities to address the food and agricultural problems of the communities, such as food policy councils and food planning associations; or

•Develop new resources and strategies to help reduce food insecurity in the community and prevent food insecurity in the future by:

oDeveloping creative food resources;

oCoordinating food services with park and recreation programs and other community- based outlets to reduce barriers to access; or

oCreating nutrition education programs for at-risk populations to enhance food purchasing and food-preparation skills and to heighten awareness of the connection between diet and health.

Grant Amount: CFP grant amounts are up to $125,000 per year and up to $400,000 over four years. PP amounts of up to $35,000 per year are available.

Eligibility: Eligible applicants include public food program service providers, tribal organizations, or private nonprofit entities, including gleaners, meeting the following four requirements: (1) (a) have experience in the area of (i) community food work, particularly concerning small and medium-size farms, including the provision of food to people in low-income communities and the development of new markets in low-income communities for agricultural producers; (ii) job training and business development activities for food-related activities in low-income communities; or (iii) efforts to reduce food insecurity in the community, including food distribution, improving access to services, or coordinating services and programs; (2) demonstrate competency to implement a project, provide fiscal accountability, collect data, and prepare reports and other necessary documentation; (3) demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers, evaluators, practitioners, and other interested parties, including a plan for dissemination of results; and (4) collaborate with 1 or more local partner organizations to achieve at least 1 hunger-free communities goal.

Due Date:  December 4, 2017 

For more information, visit: https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/rfa/18_CommunityFoodProjectsRFA.pdf

 


Dec 08 2017

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Farm to School Program is housed within the Food and Nutrition Services’ (FNS) Office of Community Food Systems (OCFS) and is accepting applications for training, supporting operations, planning, purchasing equipment; developing school gardens; developing partnerships; and implementing farm to school programs.

Geographical diversity and equitable treatment of urban, rural, and tribal communities are ensured, and the highest priority goes to funding projects that:

•Make local food products available on the menu of the eligible school;

•Serve a high proportion of children who are eligible for free or reduced price lunches; 

•Incorporate experiential nutrition education activities in curriculum planning that encourage the participation of school children in farm and garden-based activities;

•Demonstrate collaboration between eligible schools, nongovernmental and community -based organizations, agricultural producer groups, and other community partners;

•Include adequate and participatory evaluation plans;

•Demonstrate the potential for long-term program sustainability; and,

•Meet any other criteria that the Secretary determines appropriate.

Each grant recipient must provide matching support in the form of cash or in-kind contributions, and agree to cooperate in an evaluation of the program carried out using grant funds.

•Implementation grants are intended to help schools, school districts, state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities working with schools or school districts to scale or further develop existing farm to school initiatives.

•Planning grants are for schools or school districts, state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities working with schools or school districts that are just getting started on farm to school activities. These funds are intended to help these entities organize and structure their efforts for maximum impact by embedding known best practices into early design considerations.

•Training grants are intended for state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non-profit entities to support trainings that strengthen farm to school supply chains, or trainings that provide technical assistance in the area of local procurement, food safety, culinary education, and/or integration of agriculture‐based curriculum.

 

Grant Amount: Grant amounts of up to $100,000 are available.

•Implementation awards range from $50,000 - $100,000.

•Planning awards range from $20,000 - $50,000.

•Training awards range from $20,000 - $50,000.

Eligibility: Eligible schools, state and local agencies, Indian tribal organizations, small- and medium-sized agricultural producers or groups of small- and medium-sized agricultural producers, and non- profit entities are eligible to receive planning and implementation grants. Eligible schools are defined as pre-K-12 School Food Authorities (SFAs), non-profit private schools, charter schools, Indian tribal schools, and others that participate in the National School Lunch or Breakfast Programs.

Due Date: December 8, 2017 

For more information, visit: https://www.fns.usda.gov/farmtoschool/fy18-farm-school-grant

 


Dec 13 2017

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is now accepting applications for the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) Grant Program for fiscal year (FY) 2018 to support projects to increase the purchase of fruits and vegetables among low-income consumers participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by providing incentives at the point of purchase.

NIFA will give priority to projects that:

•Maximize the share of funds used for direct incentives to participants;

•Test innovative or promising strategies that would contribute to our understanding of how best to increase the purchase of fruits and vegetables by SNAP participants, that would inform future efforts;

•Develop innovative or improved benefit redemption systems that could be replicated or scaled;

•Use direct-to-consumer sales marketing;

•Demonstrate a track record of designing and implementing successful nutrition incentive programs that connect low-income consumers and agricultural producers;

•Provide locally or regionally produced fruits and vegetables, especially culturally appropriate fruits and vegetables for the target audience;

•Are located in underserved communities, particularly Promise Zones and StrikeForce communities (see website for more information);

•Focus on incentives that are most likely to directly and efficiently increase the purchase and consumption of FINI qualifying fruits and vegetables by SNAP clients;

•Require that SNAP recipients utilize their EBT cards to make qualifying food purchases in order to earn FINI incentives.

NIFA is soliciting applications for three types of grants:

•FINI Pilot Projects (FPP): FPPs are aimed at new entrants seeking funding for a project in the early stages of incentive program development. Applicants should request a budget commensurate with the proposed project. No single FINI Pilot project (FPP) award shall exceed $100,000 for the total project period.

•FINI Projects (FP): FINI Projects are aimed at mid-sized groups developing incentive programs at the local or State level. Applicants should request a budget and project period commensurate with the proposed project. FP proposals should include a budget of no more than $500,000 for a project period not to exceed four years. 

•FINI Large Scale Projects (FLSP): FLSPs are aimed at groups developing multi-county, state-wide, and regional incentive programs with the largest target audience of all FINI projects. Applicants should request a budget and project period commensurate with the proposed project. FLSP proposals should include a budget of $500,000 or more for a project period not to exceed four years.

Grant Amount: Grant amounts range up to $500,000 per year, depending on the type of project.

Eligibility: Eligibility to receive this grant is limited to government agencies and non-profit organizations.

Due Date:  December 13, 2017

For more information, visit: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view- opportunity.html?oppId=297637

 


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